Spicy Shrimp & Spinach Ramen Soup 

Ramen is a cheap, cozy, comfort food perfect for those of us who want a quick meal. But eating the same budget-friendly cup of noodles everyday can get boring. Here is a recipe that will make your noodles taste better

Serves 2

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Ramen is a cheap, cozy, comfort food perfect for those of us who want a quick meal. But eating the same budget-friendly cup of noodles everyday can get boring. Here is a recipe that will make your noodles taste better while giving you extra calories and flavor to help get you through an abstention day. I used spicy Harissa I picked up at Trader Joes, but you can substitute Chili Garlic Sauce to give it that extra kick! If your radishes come with greens attached, chop them up and add them to the soup when it’s time to add the spinach. Radish greens are healthy and delicious.

“Confession heals, confession justifies, confession grants pardon of sin…In confession there is a chance for mercy. Believe it firmly. Hope and have confidence in confession.” – Saint Isidore

Ingredients

  • 1 3-ounce package Shrimp Flavor Ramen Noodle Soup
  • 5 shrimp, peeled and deveined 
  • 1 or 2 radishes, sliced
  • 1 cup fresh spinach
  • 1 teaspoon Harissa Hot Chili Pepper Paste
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

Instructions

  1. Boil 2 1/2 cups water in a saucepan. Add the noodles and cook on high heat for 2 minutes while stirring occasionally.
  2. Add the shrimp flavor packet and all of the remaining ingredients and stir well. Lower to medium-high heat and cook for 1 more minute. 
  3. Cover with a lid, remove from heat, and let sit for 2 more minutes until the shrimp are cooked. Serve in a large soup bowl and enjoy!

Download the Exodus 90 App

Posts you may like

If we return to the prayer and fasting of the Ember Days, we have the opportunity to sacrifice for the renewal of the Church.
Join us through the Exodus app each Monday in praying the Office of the Dead for all our beloved departed ones.
How do these five unique practices help us live the Lenten spirit inside and outside the liturgy?